Gardening versus Painting

I once heard the horticulture legend Mike McGrath describe gardening as an “exercise in failure”. Meaning that you try things, you fail at them, you learn from your mistakes, and then you try again. Or you will wise up and hire a professional to do it for you. That is what I do with painting projects – hire someone that knows what they are doing. But with gardening, I continue to fail and come back for more.

The Thrill of the Hunt

I do this because I enjoy the thrill of the hunt when it comes to gardening. I enjoy the major landscaping overhauls, the weeding, the raking, the planting, the pruning, the mulching – all of it. Then I look for the next project. Something that lets me build on what I have learned and expand my creativity.

When we have a room that needs to be painted, I look forward to spending time in an improved room. I get nothing out of the process of painting. It is a grind to me. A wasted Saturday. So I hire someone to do paint projects for me.

I love to garden, I understand the need to paint.

We sometimes consider the “thrill of the hunt” to be a negative thing. In relationships, it does not lend itself towards long, sustainable partnerships. However, in everything from golf to the violin to math, it can lead to greatness. This is not an original or even complex thought – the best golfer isn’t the one that enjoys admiring his trophies – he’s the one that wants to spend every hour of every day perfecting his putting game. I promise, this isn’t a 10,000 hours thing – but let’s be honest, you aren’t spending 10,000 hours on something that you don’t enjoy the process of.

Find your Gardening

Most of us will never be paid to play golf or the violin, but us mere mortals can learn from those that do as we embark on our own careers. We tend to gravitate towards the things we are good at, because that is what people are willing to pay us for. But if you find that work to be boring or tedious (how I view painting), work will be painful and you will find yourself defining success in purely monetary terms.

If you are lucky enough to find something that you enjoy – where you enjoy the thrill of the hunt, not just the end result – the good news is that you don’t even need to be good at it. This will be like me gardening. I’m still not very good, but I’m getting better. And I’m going to keep showing up every spring ready to tackle everything my yard and mother nature have thrown at me. Find your thing. Stick to it. Get better. Maybe someone will pay you for it one day.

Since we exist in the real world with bills to pay and food to eat, your career will probably not be one giant passion project. To build a career (a real career), you will need to do a lot of painting in addition to gardening. As you progress in your career, you will find yourself able to do more gardening and have others, that have chosen to specialize in painting, do the painting for you. This is how you become an expert in your field, how you get to flex your creative muscles, and you achieve the all important status of enjoying the thrill of the hunt at work.

 

 

 

 

Running

I was just sitting down to write a post that I had already written in its entirety. My only issue was that I had written it in my head while I was running. And now the details are gone. I remember the general theme of the post, but I struggle to replicate what had come to me so naturally while I was running. This isn’t entirely surprising because I had been running a few days ago, and never bothered to write anything down. It was also a reminder of how valuable running is to my creativity and productivity at work.

Running has helped me solve some of the more challenging riddles I have faced in my career. I don’t receive the spark of a brilliant idea, like you see in the movies, but I seem to gain better perspective on the problem I am working on. This is especially important, as it is often crucial for me to understand what my client’s true motivations are. This isn’t to suggest anything nefarious, but client requests can often be filtered through several layers of people. Or situations aren’t necessarily well understood by senior leaders that engage consultants.

I think there is a larger lesson here about stepping away. Stop working and go do the thing that you enjoy, relaxes you, helps recharge your batteries. No matter how “in it” we are, how close we are to a looming deadline, how much work there is to be done, sometimes you need to step away. As strategists, we don’t solve problems through brute force. There aren’t always linear progressions to the right answer. Life can be messy, and it can help to step away and just let your mind wander.